10 Quirky Islands From Around the World

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Many of us like to vacation on islands or even live on them. But the islands listed below are the ones which are still virtually unknown. Take a look at 10 unusual and quirky islands and you’ll see just what we mean!

 

 

1. Isla de las Muñecas (Island of the Dolls) – Xochimilco, Mexico
If you like creepy dolls, this is the place for you. According to legend, Don Julian Santana Barrera, who owned the island, came across a girl who had drowned in a canal. Noticing a doll nearby that he assumed was hers, he hung it from a tree as something of a tribute. Because nothing says respect more than hanging a doll from a tree, right? Over the 50 years that followed, Barrera decorated the island’s trees with thousands of dolls in order to appease the spirit of the girl, who he claimed he could hear. Though he died in 2001, the dolls are still there and you can reach the island by boat. Let your slow descent into doll madness begin.

 

 

2. Pig Beach – Big Major Cay, the Bahamas
Dream about swimming with dolphins? We have a more novel idea: why not swim with pigs? If you make your way to Big May Cay, a small uninhabited island in the Bahamas, you can! How the hell did they get there, you’re asking? According to one story, they were dropped off by a group of sailors who had intended to make a feast out of them, only to change their mind and not return to the island. Cynics claim they were put there as a scheme to attract tourism. But the most likely explanation is that after a night at the clubs, a group of mischievous pigs stole a boat on a dare and went for a joy ride, only to crash onto the island and settle there. Either way, this pork tenderloin on the hoof looks delicious.

3. Fort Carroll – south of Baltimore, Maryland
Eager to explore an abandoned hexagonal sea fort on an artificial island? Fort Carroll just south of Baltimore has you covered. Constructed in 1848, the purpose of the fort was to defend Baltimore against outside invaders. Presumably the Vikings, Goths, Orcs and such. The only thing it protects these days are birds. The fort was used a bit during the Spanish-American War in 1898, but that’s pretty much it. The guns were removed after World War I broke out to be used elsewhere, probably because the Germans had no interest in conquering Baltimore. And can you really blame them?

 

 

4. Bouvet Island – South Atlantic Ocean
Bouvet Island holds the distinction of being the most remote island in the world. No people live there, obviously, but it’s an important breeding ground for a variety of birds. Although it’s located between South Africa and Antarctica, the UK and Norway had a dispute over ownership. Probably because it’s home to the macaroni penguin. In any event, Norway was eventually allowed to annex the island in 1930. So if you have ever experienced sleepless nights about Norway’s imperial ambitions, your fears are definitely well-grounded. Norway now claims the macaroni penguin as it’s official national bird or is it their hockey clubs team mascot? I forget.

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