Sherlock Finale: 10 Easter Eggs & References We’ve All Missed

Page: 1 of 3
1
2
3
Advertisements

The season finale of Sherlock on BBC blew the socks off thousands of viewers. The plot threatened the lives of each and every character we love and care for so much. Obviously there are some crazy details that we missed while getting all emotional. Critics consider the episode pretty controversial and it may very well turn out to be the last episode of the whole show just like its creators Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat threatened. This episode was action-packed and took all the characters to a locked underground room designed to trap and scare the hell out of them. It might seem that this episode was far from Doyle’s work, but you’ll be surprised to find lots of references and Easter eggs that nod to the original Sherlock Holmes. Here are 10 things you’ve probably missed in the Final Problem.

 

 

Sherrinford
We finally get to know what this reference actually means – the facility for ‘uncontainables’, including the highly sociopathic sibling of Sherlock Holmes – Eurus. The name originated from William Baring-Gould’s biography of Sherlock Holmes where it was used as the name of Sherlock’s third brother. Conan Doyle actually thought to use it as Sherlock’s name.
Sherlock-finale-10-easter-eggs-references-weve-all-missed1

 

 

Sherlock’s trauma
Redbeard’s death was such a traumatic experience that it actually caused Sherlock to forget all about his sister. This was the very thing that made him the way he was – a calculating machine with close to no emotions at all. This idea was inspired by The Seven Per-Cent Solution by Nicholas Meyer’s where Holmes visits Dr. Freud and uncovers a childhood trauma. The Young Sherlock Holmes movie plays with the same idea.
Sherlock-finale-10-easter-eggs-references-weve-all-missed2

Oscar Wilde
Mycroft quotes the famous writer when he says “truth is rarely pure and never simple.” We should thank the Victorian writer as he was the one who inspired Doyle to write about Sherlock back in the day. The two attended a party together where they discussed the depicting of evil in literature. Wild then wrote The Picture of Dorian Gray and Doyle resurrected Sherlock Holmes.
Sherlock-finale-10-easter-eggs-references-weve-all-missed3

 

 

Baker Street on fire
Doyle’s ‘The Final Problem‘ actually had a similar scene that wasn’t, of course, as dramatic – there was a fire set by Moriarty, whereas in the episode we see a drone with a ‘patience grenade’ that destroys the whole house. It was one of the most intense scenes in the episode!
Sherlock-finale-10-easter-eggs-references-weve-all-missed4

Advertisements
Page: 1 of 3
1
2
3

Loading...