10 Unique Dog Breeds From Around the World

: 1 of 3
1
2
3
Advertisements

Say, are you a dog person? What a coincidence – so am I! Dogs are really awesome. One of the things that makes them truly unique is just how diverse their species is. They come in all sizes, colors, and appearances.

 

With so many different dog breeds to choose from, which one we ultimate adopt depends on a variety of factors. If you live in a small, confined apartment, opting for yorkie makes more sense than, say, a St. Bernard. If you’ve got children, more than likely you’ll agree that a gentle border collie is more appropriate than a pitbull. You’d also want to decide whether you want a German shepherd to serve as a guard dog or a cocker spaniel who will basically roll on their backs and request belly rubs from even the most random of strangers. Then there are those who are looking for something completely different: an exotic dog that nobody else on the block owns. If that sounds like you, you’re in luck! Here’s a look at 10 unusual breeds that will definitely make you stick out from the typical dog owner.

 

 

1. Catalburun
Also known as a Turkish Pointer, the Catalburun is known for its distinct split nose, possibly caused by inbreeding due to the rarity of the breed. If so, that’s kind of sad! Although it was originally believed that their unusual noses gave them super smelling abilities (which is why they became popular as hunting dogs), modern science would seem to dispel this notion.

 

 

2. Tibetan Mastiff
These large beasts have been bred in Asia for around 2,500 years, initially to protect nomadic tribes from tigers, bears and the like. Not a surprise given that they pretty much look half bear and half tiger. Fun fact: this breed isn’t actually even a mastiff! It’s just that when Europeans saw them for the first time, they decided to lump them together since they were big. The same mistake was made when they first encountered Tibetan “Spaniel” and Tibetan “Terrier.” What a bunch of breed-misidentifying goofballs, eh?


3. Azawakh
This breed is native to Africa and originally served as hunting and herding dogs for the Tuareg, a nomadic people who live principally in the Sahara. Let’s get one thing out of the way: while the Azawakh vaguely resembles a greyhound, they are not one in the same, understood? They are speedy and have long legs, but their bones are flatter than their greyhound counterparts. In addition, they walk with something of a feline gait. Meow?

 

 

4. New Guinea Singing Dog
Is it a wild dog? Domesticated? A dingo? All of the above? Scientists aren’t entirely sure how to classify this rare breed native to New Guinea. As their name indicates, they are most known for their distinct, high-pitched howl. They are known to be very gentle around people, with no recorded incidences of biting.

Advertisements
: 1 of 3
1
2
3


Loading...